The Romance of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table

The Romance of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table From the Preface by Alfred W Pollard There is much repetition in the Morte d Arthur as Malory left it How often Sir Breuse sans Pitie played his ugly tricks or Tristram rescued Palomides or minor kn

  • Title: The Romance of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table
  • Author: Thomas Malory Alfred W. Pollard Arthur Rackham
  • ISBN: 9780517231364
  • Page: 442
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From the Preface by Alfred W Pollard There is much repetition in the Morte d Arthur as Malory left it How often Sir Breuse sans Pitie played his ugly tricks, or Tristram rescued Palomides, or minor knights met at adventure and emulated their betters, it is not easy to count I have tried to clear away some of the underwoods that the great trees may be better seen, and tFrom the Preface by Alfred W Pollard There is much repetition in the Morte d Arthur as Malory left it How often Sir Breuse sans Pitie played his ugly tricks, or Tristram rescued Palomides, or minor knights met at adventure and emulated their betters, it is not easy to count I have tried to clear away some of the underwoods that the great trees may be better seen, and though I know that I have cleared away some small timber that is fine stuff in itself, if the great trees stand out the better, the experiment may be forgiven In attempting it I have introduced, I think, not than a hundred words of my own, but in certain places I have taken over the readings devised half a century ago for the well known Globe edition by Sir Edward Strachey, which has justified itself by passing through some twenty editions, and has probably brought Malory readers than all other texts put together.

    • The Romance of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table by Thomas Malory Alfred W. Pollard Arthur Rackham
      442 Thomas Malory Alfred W. Pollard Arthur Rackham
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      Posted by:Thomas Malory Alfred W. Pollard Arthur Rackham
      Published :2019-08-17T14:50:18+00:00


    About “Thomas Malory Alfred W. Pollard Arthur Rackham

    • Thomas Malory Alfred W. Pollard Arthur Rackham

      Sir Thomas Malory was a knight in the fifteenth century, who, while imprisoned, compiled the collection of tales we know as Le Morte D Arthur, translating the legend of King Arthur from original French tales such as the Vulgate Cycle.



    645 thoughts on “The Romance of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table

    • A book for book-lovers. Malory and Rackham. Excalibur! Originally published in 1917 as an abridgement of the classic MORTE D'ARTHUR, this is the 1979 reprint featuring those gorgeous illustrations of Merlin and Arthur and Launcelot and Galahad. You will believe.Given the number of knights it is sometimes hard to weed out the forest, but my favorite is Sir Tristram. If he lived today, he would be a beach dudewith a deadly sword. So cool, so easy-going (Launcelot tends to veer on the moody side). [...]



    • I first came to King Arthur with a small book with the tales retold by Charles Kingsley.That sold mer good. Then I saw the MGM movie with Robert Taylor as Sir Lancelot, Ava Gardner as Guinivere and Mel Ferrer, unkindly described as " a wet charge of powder " by one critic,as an idealistic but whimpy King Arthur. (But Stanley Baker made a superb villan.)Who cared!! In 1953 this was MGM's first Cinemascope production, even shot in England (with American accents.)Years later I saw the Round Table i [...]


    • I read this book completely for the illustrations, ad as per usual with Rackham's work I was not disappointed. The large colour panels are what most people are drawn to with his work, but I was just as appreciative of the b&w line drawings scattered throughout the text. Many were simply decorative and didn't depict a specific scene from the tales, but Rackham's mastery of line is still clearly showcased in each illustration. I couldn't actually choose a favourite colour piece, as there are t [...]


    • What a treat to read Thomas Malory's 1485 translation, although sometimes unfortunately abridged, of the seminal tales of Western Europe's mythic soul. The language rang with the adventures of knightly heroes - Sir Tristan, Sir Galahad, Sir Gawaine - the Sangreal quest and the eternal tragic triangle of Arthur, Lancelot, and Guinevere. New to me was Sir Bors who seems much the most dependable friend any knight, king, or queen could have. Over 1,600 years later, the dream of the once and future k [...]


    • One gets a bit tired of the same stories told over and over . . . only the names changing, basically. And seriously, how lame was the kind of chivalry the Romance celebrates? Still, it bears reading, even before the final section, which inspired "Camelot." I have to say that I did enjoy reading such archaic English, for such a long story!


    • The dialogue in the book is old English and sometimes hard to follow. It's also repetitive with tournaments and jousts in every chapter. Lots of violence too. Still, the book gives all the details to the stories I've heard and read about King Arthur.





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