Yucatan Before and After the Conquest

Yucatan Before and After the Conquest These people also used certain characters or letters with which they wrote in their books about the antiquities and their sciences We found a great number of books in these letters and since they con

  • Title: Yucatan Before and After the Conquest
  • Author: Diego de Landa William Gates
  • ISBN: 9780486236223
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Paperback
  • These people also used certain characters or letters, with which they wrote in their books about the antiquities and their sciences We found a great number of books in these letters and since they contained nothing but superstitions and falsehoods of the devil we burned them all, which they took most grievously, and which gave them great pain.So writes Friar Diego de LandThese people also used certain characters or letters, with which they wrote in their books about the antiquities and their sciences We found a great number of books in these letters and since they contained nothing but superstitions and falsehoods of the devil we burned them all, which they took most grievously, and which gave them great pain.So writes Friar Diego de Landa in his Relaci n De las cosas de Yucatan of 1566, the basic book in Maya studies Landa did all he could to wipe out Maya culture and civilization In the famous auto da f of July 1562 at Man , as he tells us, he destroyed 5,000 idols and burned 27 hieroglyphic rolls And yet paradoxically Landa s book, written in Spain to defend himself against charges of despotic mismanagement, is the only significant account of Yucatan done in the early post Conquest era As the distinguished Maya scholar William Gates states in his introduction, ninety nine percent of what we today know of the Mayas, we know as the result either of what Landa has told us in the pages that follow, or have learned in the use and study of what he told Yucatan Before and After the Conquest is the first English translation of this very important work.Landa s book gives us a full account of Maya customs, daily activities, history, ceremonial festivals, and the many social and communal functions in which their life was expressed Included here are the geography and natural history of Yucatan, the history of the Conquest, indigenous architecture and other aspects of Maya civilization sciences, books, religion, etc , native historical traditions, the Inquisition instituted by the Spanish clergy, Maya clothing, food, commerce, agriculture, human sacrifices, calendrical lore, and much .

    • Yucatan Before and After the Conquest « Diego de Landa William Gates
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      Published :2019-06-04T12:37:53+00:00


    About “Diego de Landa William Gates

    • Diego de Landa William Gates

      Diego de Landa William Gates Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Yucatan Before and After the Conquest book, this is one of the most wanted Diego de Landa William Gates author readers around the world.



    935 thoughts on “Yucatan Before and After the Conquest

    • The stars I've given this 'book' are meaningless. You might as well think of them as not even being there (In fact I'll probably go back and make it a starless rating).This "review" is mostly a short lesson, rather than a review, for those of who who might be interested in post-contact Mesoamerica. If you don't give a crap about Mesoamerica, let alone post-contact, then you might not want to read any further. Diego De Landa is a mixed bag, and he left us a mixed legacy. De Landa was a Spanish Bi [...]


    • In 1562, Friar Diego de Landa of Yucatan discovered that some of the Indians who had supposedly been converted to Christianity some 20 years before did, in fact, worship their old "idols". He conducted an inquiry in the best traditions of the Spanish Inquisition, torturing some 4500 Indians and causing the deaths of 158, burned 5000 "idols" and 27 hieroglyphic books. The Church was alarmed that Landa had overstepped the boundaries of his authority, and recalled him to Spain to stand trial before [...]


    • I certainly had mixed feelings about this book. I came across this book in a store in Mexico (one of the few) and was curious. First, I have made many trips to the Yucatan area including Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Coba, Izamal and Ek Balam, too name a few. I certainly know their architecture and art, their general timeline and of course, what happens with the arrival of the Spanish. As of late I have made a few trips to Spain, including seeing the first gold from Mexico in the cathedral in Toledo. As [...]


    • Mayan Culture Preserved by One Who Sought Its DestructionWhile driving on the lonely highway toward the city of Valladolid, in the center of Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, on the horizon loomed a surreal shadow. I tried to imagine what this palatial structure could be. Upon arriving at the charming colonial city, I came upon a magnificent Spanish colonial monastary. What was amazing was that it was built upon the base of a pyramid razed by the Spanish conquistadores, who reused the stones for their [...]


    • Friar Diego de Landa came to Mexico in the early 1500´s. His job was to convert the Mayans to Christianity. However, he was often cruel and tortured the local people as an inquisitor. He was sent back to Spain to face judgment. While there, he wrote this books about his knowledge of the Mayan people.This is a good book about the geography and culture of the Mayans in the Yucatán. I am impressed he wrote this book based on his memories of the time he lived in the Yucatán area. His explanation [...]


    • An interesting AND boring bit of history concerning the subjugation of the Mayan peoples of the Yucatan in the 1500's. From anthropological and sociological points of view, this is an interesting book. However, it was quite a slog to get through.In the mid-1500's, Friar Diego de Landa was called back to the King of Spain's court to justify his horrific treatment of the native peoples of the Yucatan. When considering how non-religious Spaniards treated the peoples of the New World, de Landa's tre [...]


    • The view of a culture from the conqueror's unfavorable and uncomprehending (is that a word?) perspective. Not among the greats of old school travel lit I'd prefer something like Ibn Batutta's travels, Marco Polo's lies, travels of John Mandeville (more lies), Sir Richard Burton, Freya Stark's Valleys of the Assassins, etc.


    • I'm sure translating a text from the 16th century is not an easy task, however, the clunky translation was a bit confusing and sometimes even comical. I guess you take what you can get since Landa destroyed most of Mayan texts and tablets.


    • The only known Western account of Maya civilisation, ironically by the priest instrumental in destroying an entire civilisation - this is what makes this book fascinating!



    • the writing is not very good but the information is. i will assume it is a top-notch translation because the foreword tells me so.


    • I stopped reading this because I found the language a little more effort than I cared to put into it, and I had already read so much ABOUT this book, that reading it itself seemed almost redundant.



    • Excelente, fácil de leer y único en su categoría. Una fuente primerísima sobre la sociedad maya y los primeros efectos de los españoles en ella


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