The West Wing

The West Wing The West Wing is an invitation to the imagination On each page a room beckons inviting the reader to wonder why three shoes lie here abandoned what is retreating in that mirror s reflection or why

  • Title: The West Wing
  • Author: Edward Gorey
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The West Wing is an invitation to the imagination On each page, a room beckons, inviting the reader to wonder why three shoes lie here abandoned, what is retreating in that mirror s reflection, or why there is an imprint of a body on the wallpaper, faded and floating four feet above the floor A wordless mystery, it is one of Gorey s finest works.

    • The West Wing by Edward Gorey
      498 Edward Gorey
    • thumbnail Title: The West Wing by Edward Gorey
      Posted by:Edward Gorey
      Published :2019-04-21T19:55:44+00:00


    About “Edward Gorey

    • Edward Gorey

      Born in Chicago, Gorey came from a colorful family his parents, Helen Dunham Garvey and Edward Lee Gorey, divorced in 1936 when he was 11, then remarried in 1952 when he was 27 One of his step mothers was Corinna Mura, a cabaret singer who had a brief role in the classic film Casablanca His father was briefly a journalist Gorey s maternal great grandmother, Helen St John Garvey, was a popular 19th century greeting card writer artist, from whom he claimed to have inherited his talents He attended a variety of local grade schools and then the Francis W Parker School He spent 1944 1946 in the Army at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, and then attended Harvard University from 1946 to 1950, where he studied French and roomed with future poet Frank O Hara.Although he would frequently state that his formal art training was negligible , Gorey studied art for one semester at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago in 1943, eventually becoming a professional illustrator From 1953 to 1960, he lived in New York City and worked for the Art Department of Doubleday Anchor, illustrating book covers and in some cases adding illustrations to the text He has illustrated works as diverse as Dracula by Bram Stoker, The War of the Worlds by H G Wells, and Old Possum s Book of Practical Cats by T S Eliot In later years he illustrated many children s books by John Bellairs, as well as books in several series begun by Bellairs and continued by other authors after his death.



    412 thoughts on “The West Wing

    • RAFFINATI ENIGMI Una storia senza parole, né dialogo né didascalie. Sembra fatta di niente. Eppure, un autentico invito per l’immaginazione. Un mistero muto che gronda umorismo nero.In ogni pagina una stanza invita il lettore a farsi domande, ne stimola la curiosità: perché ci sono tre scarpe abbandonate per terra, cos’è che sembra nascondersi nel riflesso delle specchio, perché c’è l’impronta di un corpo sulla carta da parati, o chi la lasciato quattro orme sul pavimento, cos’ [...]


    • It's amazing how something can be so unsettling without actually being about anything.The West Wing is a series of intricate, dark drawings depicting unusual events taking place in a house, in no real order of any kind. It leaves the "story" up to the readers' imagination, which allows it to be much creepier than it is.You can determine if the West Wing is haunted, or maybe everyone in it is insane. Maybe it's perfectly normal. It's your decision, after all.


    • "Relectura" de uno de los libros que componen el box set "La fábrica de vinagre" del maestro oscuro Edward Gorey. No hay diálogos, no hay textos, ni una sola palabra que pueda delatar el misterio tras las lóbregas imágenes que se nos presentan en "El ala oeste". No hay mucho que explicar, lo más probable es que nunca lleguemos a entender del todo qué nos habrá querido transmitir Gorey con su arte. Pero de alguna forma, logra acelerar mi corazón.





    • In the west wing Gorey tells 30 individual stories through 30 captivating illustrations. With each frame comes the question, why?Why is this man lying on the floor?Why are there only 3 shoes scattered on the floor? Why is that rock on the table and so on, so forth.I spent an age studying each illustration looking for clues that would give an answer. Alas Gorey is the master of mystery. It is up to the imagination to decide the outcome. The West Wing wasn't one of my favourites but again the myst [...]


    • Creepy in a masterfully reserved kind of way. Completely wordless, Gorey presents thirty illustrations of the titular wing and leaves the reader to render their meaning. The most unsettling for me is the one where, looking into a mirror, you see the legs and feet of a figure not quite out the door behind you. The thought that I would have caught it if I'd just turned the page sooner gave me such a chill. Really loving this Gorey kick I've wandered onto, and I must find more.


    • Keep looking at this grows on you!, 22 Oct 2014This review is from: The West Wing (Hardcover)Thirty strange b/w drawings of room interiors, each requiring you to look and use your imagination to see what (might) be going on: a shadow on a wall of an apparently levitating woman; a ghostly face peering through a window and a letter on the floor; two (handkerchiefs?) flying; a candle apparently flying through the air The more I looked at this, the more I liked it.


    • I loved this book because I have absolutely no idea what it is about but know it is about something. The illustrations are incredibly cool. I kept trying to look deeper to see. Although I loved this one, I still prefer The Gashlycrumb Tinies. That book is hilarious.


    • This is all about inference and imagination. Regular readers of Gorey will recognise the eerie Edwardian architecture, the hideous patterns, the half-obscured body in the drawing room. Each weird picture suggests its own story: together, they create something disturbing and bizarre. This is not his funniest book, or his most ghoulish, but it is oddly haunting. Utterly distinctive and unique.


    • Charming as always. One of Gorey's wordless classics--the artwork here is intense and gorgeous and contains one of his most enchanting drawing (to me), of a nude man ( I believe to be modeled on Gorey himself--it greatly resembles him in his youth) standing before a marble balcony, that echoes the curves of his muscular legs. Extraordinary.


    • Edward Gorey books are generally short, but this one's the shortest that I've read yet. Only 30 pages and no text. It's a collection of snap shots of the imaginary West Wing of an Edwardian manor house, owned by some distant relation of the Addams Family. You'll find empty rooms, an overturned chair, a mummy and a naked bearded man among other disturbing sights. Quite lovely.


    • Two stars the first time I read it, five the second. I'll go with four. Review to come.(Reread in Amphigorey; reviewing separately.)


    • FrighteningI had to read this in a well lit area. Some combination of the lack of words, the black and white drawings, the seeming randomness of it, and the off drawings made this justaryI found myself wondering what story was behind each page and how it all tied together. How inspiring!


    • This is a wordless work and Gorey’s illustrates are strangely beautiful, a little unsettling, but also vague so much of the plot is up to you (not that that’s a bad thing). The story seems to be about a haunted house but as to what is actually happening is certainly up for interpretation


    • This isn't an ordinary book So magical, mysterious, silent and dark. My favorite of Gorey's for sure!! I read this book while listening to thisyoutube/watch?v=NnPpjXIt elevated it into another level. Loved it!


    • This particular piece by Gorey helped cement my love of gothic horror. I love its understated creepiness, leaving so much to the imagination.











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