Divinity and Humanity: The Incarnation Reconsidered

Divinity and Humanity The Incarnation Reconsidered The doctrine of the Incarnation lies at the heart of Christianity But the idea that God was in Christ has become a much debated topic in modern theology Oliver Crisp addresses six key issues in the In

  • Title: Divinity and Humanity: The Incarnation Reconsidered
  • Author: Oliver D. Crisp
  • ISBN: 9780521695350
  • Page: 185
  • Format: Paperback
  • The doctrine of the Incarnation lies at the heart of Christianity But the idea that God was in Christ has become a much debated topic in modern theology Oliver Crisp addresses six key issues in the Incarnation defending a robust version of the doctrine, in keeping with classical Christology He explores perichoresis, or interpenetration, with reference to both the IncaThe doctrine of the Incarnation lies at the heart of Christianity But the idea that God was in Christ has become a much debated topic in modern theology Oliver Crisp addresses six key issues in the Incarnation defending a robust version of the doctrine, in keeping with classical Christology He explores perichoresis, or interpenetration, with reference to both the Incarnation and Trinity Over two chapters Crisp deals with the human nature of Christ and then provides an argument against the view, common amongst some contemporary theologians, that Christ had a fallen human nature He considers the notion of divine kenosis or self emptying, and discusses non Incarnational Christology, focusing on the work of John Hick This view denies Christ is God Incarnate, regarding him as primarily a moral exemplar to be imitated Crisp rejects this alternative account of the nature of Christology.

    • Divinity and Humanity: The Incarnation Reconsidered by Oliver D. Crisp
      185 Oliver D. Crisp
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      Published :2019-06-04T18:35:30+00:00


    About “Oliver D. Crisp

    • Oliver D. Crisp

      Oliver D Crisp born 1972 is a British theologian who currently works as a professor of systematic theology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California Crisp was, until 2011, a reader in divinity at Bristol University in the United Kingdom He specializes in analytic theology, philosophical theology, and historical theology His historical work focuses on eighteenth and nineteenth century American Reformed theologians, including Jonathan Edwards and William Shedd His constructive work has, to date, primarily been in the areas of Christology and hamartiology.He earned his Bachelor s degree and Masters of Theology from the University of Aberdeen He received his Ph.D from the University of London in 2003 His thesis focused on the philosophical theology of Jonathan Edwards, and was supervised by Paul Helm.He is the author or editor of seven books and has written numerous articles in theology The covers of Crisp s singly authored works often feature his own art.Crisp is an Evangelical and Reformed Calvinist Christian and a member of the Presbyterian Church U.S.ABiography from.



    896 thoughts on “Divinity and Humanity: The Incarnation Reconsidered

    • Just how important is orthodoxy for the doctrine of the incarnation for Christian theology? Well, according to Dr. Oliver Crisp, the answer is very much so. In the past century, the incarnation has been distorted and dismissed as either contradictory or paradox. Unwittingly, much of these debates are rehashings of earlier heresies, specifically Apollinarianism ("God in a bod") and Nestorianism ("Two persons in one body"). So, in six successive essays, Crisp defends and draws from a 'broadly' Cha [...]


    • Excellent discussion of several issues in Christology using the tools of analytic theology as applied to theological issues (known as analytic theology). Crisp discusses perichoresis with respect to the hypostatic union, the human nature of Christ, the an-enhypostsia distinction, kenosis, and non-incarnational Christologies a la Hick. Crisp makes use of a lot of contemporary metaphysics in the model of faith seeking understanding. Some of this is pretty thick, and at least two careful reads are [...]


    • Рядко давам петица, но това определено е много добра книга. Материята е трудна, но авторът пише много ясно, обяснява какво има в предвид и препраща към допълнителни материали. Препоръчвам я на всеки, който се интереува от начално, кратко, но задълбочено въведение в христолог [...]


    • A very well written book. Crisp does the work that few other thinkers have taken up. What he proves along the way is that Chalcedon got Christology right and that the further clarification of Chacedonian Christology made at Constantinople III (dyothelitism) is the only workable Christology. Crisp shows quite conclusively how all of the novel attempt to reinterpret Christology ultimately fall into gross error and lead to the heretical stances Chalcedon and Constantinople III strove to protect the [...]


    • An excellent collection of essays, centering around the relation of the two natures of Christ to his person and to one another. It serves well as a defense of a broadly Chalcedonian Christology. In particular, the essays dealing with the taxonomy of approaches to the question of Christ's human nature (chapter 2), the critique of the idea that Christ had a fallen human nature (chapter 4), and in my opinion a devastating takedown of recent "kenotic Christologies" (chapter 5) were especially strong [...]


    • The last two chapters saved this book for me. Crisp is concise and cogent in his deconstruction of kenotic Christology and John Hicks' non-incarnational Christology. But the first four chapters were, in my opinion, not a good model for systematic theology. There was little exegesis of Scripture, and much of I see as philosophical playing with words to propose different "theologically interesting" possible ways of understanding Christ's two natures. On this topic, I felt the book lacked reverence [...]


    • This is my second book of Crisp's, the former being one of his books on the Trinity. This book on Christology was much better, much deeper in analysis, with really solid reasoning. Crisp is very gracious. He interacts with a number of Christological deviations (from Chalcedon and classical Christology), examining their arguments and highlighting their weaknesses.


    • Oliver Crisp is a fellow beard with a high frequency Christology. You know it's a top notch book when the author uses Superman to illustrate Alvin Plantinga's Christological position, in a Cambridge press book nonetheless! In some points, highly technical. But overall it's a great read.




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