The Beastly Bride

The Beastly Bride What do werewolves vampires and the Little Mermaid have in common They are all shapechangers In The Beastly Bride acclaimed editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling bring together original stories a

  • Title: The Beastly Bride
  • Author: Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak
  • ISBN: 9780670011452
  • Page: 335
  • Format: Hardcover
  • What do werewolves, vampires, and the Little Mermaid have in common They are all shapechangers In The Beastly Bride, acclaimed editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling bring together original stories and poems from a stellar lineup of authors including Peter S Beagle, Ellen Kushner, Jane Yolen, Lucius Shepard, and Tanith Lee, as well as many new, diverse voices TerriWhat do werewolves, vampires, and the Little Mermaid have in common They are all shapechangers In The Beastly Bride, acclaimed editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling bring together original stories and poems from a stellar lineup of authors including Peter S Beagle, Ellen Kushner, Jane Yolen, Lucius Shepard, and Tanith Lee, as well as many new, diverse voices Terri Windling provides a scholarly, yet accessible introduction, and Charles Vess s decorations open each story From Finland to India, the Pacific Northwest to the Hamptons, shapechangers are part of our magical landscape and The Beastly Bride is sure to be one of the most acclaimed anthologies of the year.

    • The Beastly Bride « Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak
      335 Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak
    • thumbnail Title: The Beastly Bride « Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak
      Posted by:Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak
      Published :2019-09-24T23:14:22+00:00


    About “Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak

    • Ellen Datlow Terri Windling Ellen Kushner Jane Yolen Peter S. Beagle Lucius Shepard Tanith Lee Christopher Barzak

      Ellen Datlow has been an award winning editor of short science fiction, fantasy, and horror for over twentyfive years She is editor of the Best Horror of the Year and has edited or co edited a large number of award winning original anthologies Her most recent are Supernatural Noir, Naked City, Blood and Other Cravings, The Beastly Bride, Teeth, Trolls Eye View, and After the last three with Terri Windling.She is the winner of multiple awards for her editing, including the World Fantasy Award, Locus Award, Hugo Award, International Horror Guild Award, the Shirley Jackson Award, and the Bram Stoker Award She was named recipient of the 2007 Karl Edward Wagner Award, given at the British Fantasy Convention for outstanding contribution to the genre And has been given the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Horror Writers Association She co hosts the popular Fantastic Fiction at KGB Bar series of readings in New York City where she lives.



    378 thoughts on “The Beastly Bride

    • Not a bad anthology overall, but not an outstanding one either, despite having some big names as contributors, such as Gaiman, Lee, Yolen, etc who don't seem to have turned up their best effort, if the quality is any indication. Some of them don't even seem to have quite got what an "Animal Bride" archetype stands for exactly, or decided to interpret it rather loosely and unorthodoxically, like Christopher Barzak with his short story Map of Seventeen, in which he baffingly interprets the animali [...]


    • One or two clinkers, and too YA, full of melodramatic melancholy, but definitely worth reading if you're interested. Plenty of lovely writing. Some stories didn't deviate far from their inspiration, while others were entirely original, so, whichever you prefer, it's here. I found the ones by Nan Fry, Richard Bowes, and Midori Snyder most intriguing & worthy.Stewart Moore's story wasn't the best, but it did have a great line: "Every one of you knows the wonders that God made in the six days o [...]


    • I am a fan of short stories. Don’t run away! I felt the need to place that command right there because I know many of you (my dear readers) are NOT into short stories. Well, I have a solution. Or correction, or whatever. It has two steps, and is guaranteed to create a love for short stories. Want to know what it is?Okay, since you asked nicely, I offer the Official Cecelia Bedelia Recipe for Inspiring Short Story Love. Step 1 – read an Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling anthology. Step 2 – if [...]


    • At least as far as genre fiction goes, Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling may just be the best editors/anthologists currently working. Together or individually, their anthologies usually manage to feature a wide variety of authors and story-telling styles under whatever theme they are gathering stories for.The Beastly Bride is the fourth volume in what they call their "mythic fiction" series, "each volume dedicated to a different aspect of world mythology." (The previous volumes were The Green Man: [...]


    • Every anthology is a mixed bag, especially when the stories are collected from many authors. Luckily, this is a very nice mix overall. I can't think of a single story that I really disliked, and most of the stories were quite good. For me, the two best were Tanith Lee's The Puma's Daughter and Peter S. Beagle's The Children of the Shark God. There are a lot of great stories in here besides those, though, and I was pleased that merfolk/selkies were well represented.


    • The trick for the editors in a themed anthology is to choose a subject that is inclusive enough to give the a variety of writers their individual choices in setting, characters and theme but that is tight enough so that the book is cohesive. In the latest addition to their series that began with "The Green Man" and includes, "The Faery Reel" and "The Coyote Road", editors Windling and Datlow manage to include Marly Youman's tale of a rural glassblower encounter with a salamander and Lucius Shepa [...]


    • A good collection as to be expected from the Mythic Anthology series put together by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. However it's not as strong as The Faerie Reel or The Coyote Road (the previous two anthologies in the series). The stories at times suffer from being too similar to their mythological source.The beauty of this series is that the stories are such fresh and inventive takes on older themes so for the stories to be too close to their inspiration is merely disappointing in this case. [...]


    • Full Review at BooklikesNot all the stories in this collection are stand-outs, and not all, thankfully, have to do with brides. Datlow and Windling, however, should get a huge round of applause and much credit for bringing back the female beast and male looker instead of just staying to the whole typical Beauty and the Beast format. Stand out stories include: “Puma’s Daughter” by Tanith Lee.


    • I really liked the story "The Children of Cadmus" because I love Greek mythology and love the goddess Artemis. I also really liked "Thimbleriggery and Fledglings" because I love the tale of Swan Lake. I also enjoyed the poems. The other stories I liked to varying extents, but overall I liked the anthology.


    • I am never disappointed by anthologies from Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, but The Beastly Bride is even more enjoyable because it enters my favorite territory--shapeshifting--and includes many of the authors I like best--Peter S. Beagle, Ellen Kushner, Jane Yolen--and introduces me to new ones. As usual, Windling shares her knowledge of mythology in the introduction.


    • Excellent stories - new takes on folk tales of the intersection between animal and human -- what happens when they are blurred


    • Lots of interesting stories here, and lots of variety. The plots and ideas came from many places and went many places.


    • Review from November 8, 2012“The Abominable Child’s Tale" by Carol Emschwiller is about happens when the title character leaves her mountaintop home for the suburbs. “The Children of Cadmus” by Ellen Kushner is about Acteon and his sister. “The Comeuppance of Creegus Maxin” by Gregory Frost features a phouka. A very nicecollection. Review from 2/25/14My favorite-est writers who are usually in these volumes, either aren’t, or their stories aren’t worth mentioning. “The Abominabl [...]


    • I have a sticky relationship with short story anthologies, because I find them difficult to review. There were the stories I loved and the authors I loved and the ones I just reacted to with an "ehh".Part of the reason is because, sooner or later, I get bored with the variations on a theme style of storytelling inherent in themed anthologies, and just want to read something that isn't another perspective, but is actually new.That being said, I've also learned that if I stick to anthologies about [...]


    • "Island lake" by E. Catherine Tobler: Family bonds! Ghosties and possibly-sentient-trees and mermish people. 4/5."The puma's daughter" by Tanith Lee: a retelling of Beauty and the Beast, but in reverse. The ending made me go ARGH WHY but it was still really great. 5/5."The selkie speaks" by Delia Sherman: A really lovely selkie poem. 5/5."The elephant's bride" by Jane Yolen: A suttee poem, so yeah, a bit disturbing. 5/5."The children of Cadmus" by Ellen Kushner: A retelling of the myth of Actaeo [...]


    • I was trying to describe this fabulous collection of short fantasy tales, and my interlocutor said, "Why do straight women always like that sort of story?" Well, I don't know, but ever since Beauty and the Beast, I've had a fondness for tales of selkies and other changelings. Not The Little Mermaid: she's too sappy and her tragedy isn't that she wants to be human but that she trusts in the love of a total stranger. More like Owl in Love, who grows into her dual self and eventually grows beyond h [...]


    • Reviewed by Kira M for TeensReadTooWerewolves, vampires, and mermaids all have one thing in common: they are shape-changers. This book is a compilation of their stories.From Finland to India, the tales cover everything from an unruly bride to new world explorers. Some are humorous, while others are tragic. These Immortals' stories have come together to confound, delight, and, most of all, entertainE BEASTLY BRIDE is an excellent anthology of some of the best stories from around the world. Some t [...]


    • A collection of twenty-two short stories with the theme of shape-shifting.My favorite quote comes from Terri Windling's introduction. She quotes Boria Sax who explains:"Marriage between a person and an animal in myth and fairy tale joins Humanity with Nature."Midair Snyder's: "The Monkey Bride," is romantic.Thimblinggery and fledgelings by Steve Berman is a version of: "Swan Lake," with the focus on Odile the Black Swan.The Flock by Lucius Shepard is a blend of: "Friday Night Lights," and Hitchc [...]


    • Always love Datlow and Windling anthologies. When it comes to these collections, I never seem to be able to put them down. Datlow and Windling are both meticulous and thoughtful editors. There were only one or two stories that I wasn't crazy about. Here are a few that I really enjoyedThe Salamander Fire by Marly YoumansThe Comeuppance of Creegus Maxin by Gregory FrostGanesha by Jeffrey FordI truly enjoyed the vast majority of stories.I also highly recommend the other anthologies in this series ( [...]


    • A great collection of stories inspired by the fairy tales of shape shifters, animal people, the intersections between human and animal. There's some traditional stuff here, such as Peter S. Beagle's "Children of the Shark God," but there's also intriguing contemporary stuff, such as "The Abominable Child's Tale" by Carol Emshwiller. There's even a few poems and some reimaginings of established fairy tales, my favorite being Steve Berman's beautiful reimagining of the relationship between Odile a [...]


    • Lately I've read many anthologies edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. This is my favorite so far. The stories here seem to have just a little more depth, and just a little more interest. The topic is fascinating, because it does not just focus on those fairy tales that involve marrying an animal (or someone transformed into an animal) but includes children of those marriages and such, even including mermaids and yetis. I didn't finish one of the short stories (The Flock) because I wasn't [...]


    • This book contains lots of different tales that provides life lesson that resonates with us in the real world but my level of interest towards this book and all of its tale wasn't quite high but the book is a great book but in my perspective it wasn't considered a noble book but the way the authors express the point of view in to fairy tale or unrealistic creatures feelings were great


    • I'm never the biggest fan of short stories, but I did enjoy this one. It was fun to see all of the different folktales from around the world modified and reimagined into the anthology, but the stories themselves were less than impressive in some cases. I did like the story "The Comeuppance of Creegus Maxin," but that was really the only one that stood out. I was disappointed that my favorite tale of shapeshifters wasn't in there, "East of the Sun and West of the Moon" AKA Beauty and the Beast!


    • Interesting stories of transformation. All in all, I'd say that my favorite was Stewart Moore's "One Thin Dime." Christopher Barzak's "Map of Seventeen" wasn't bad either, but the ending was a little too neat and pat.


    • This book was alright. I really love books about half humans, but I like books that go into depth the differences between our worlds, or the stuggle between humanity and the wild beast. Bruce Coville's Half Humans does that really well. This book felt at times more like a bunch of seeds of stories. There were some well-developed ones, but mostly just good ideas that needed more fleshing-out.


    • Tanith Lee "The Puma's Daughter" A story unusually set in an alternate American pioneering community, the setting more prosaic than Tanith often delivers. A good story in the midst of a solid collection.Ellen Kushner "Children of Cadmus" This story did not quite cohere for me, but I strongly recommend it to those who love Greek mythology.


    • In terms of retold folk stories and fairy tales, I'm not sure YA does it for anymore. Maybe my tastes are changing, maybe I've read too much Angela Carter, maybe I've just read these partcular stories before in other anthologies, but I didn't enjoy this collection as much as I thought I would.


    • As with most anthologies edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, the proportion of good stories to not-my-favorite stories is tipped towards the good. Definitely an intriguing collection of shape-changer stories.


    • Any of the myth collections edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling are worth reading. The writing is beautiful, humorous, sad, haunting, and memorable. You will be introduced to a lot of new authors and there is a great recommended reading list at the end of each book.


    • This book is STUPENDOUS. The quality of the writing is excellent, the variety of interpretations of shape-shifter folklore is fascinating, and, to boot, many of the stories are super queer-friendly! Woohoo, I loved this book!


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